Archive for 'Photo Tips'

Happy Fourth of July! I love celebrating the summer holiday with cool, juicy watermelon, friends, family, and plenty of sparklers. Today I’m excited to share with you some helpful hints about how to photograph fireworks and capture those sweet summer memories! (You also might want to check out this post from last year with a refresher, too.)

how to photograph fireworks

Fireworks can be tricky to photograph because of their long exposure times. Give yourself the space to be creative and make mistakes — experience is the best teacher, right? 😉 Make sure your camera is on a stable surface or use a remote shutter to avoid any camera shake.

For more great ideas for how to photograph fireworks this summer, check out my holiday photo tips board on Pinterest with links that will help you capture the holiday with your DSLR or smartphone!

Here’s to capturing the fun of summer holidays! Cheers!

How are you celebrating the Fourth? Let’s hear it in the comments below!

 

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Ready to learn more? Sign up (at the top right) for my email newsletter to keep up with news and events around the studio!

To learn more about booking your family portrait session or a workshop, contact me via the website, or email me directly at info@cathymoresphotography.com. Cathy is located in Manhattan, Kansas, and frequently travels to her clients around the Midwest. To find out details regarding upcoming travel dates, or to book a custom travel session, please contact for more information and availability.

Happy Spring Break! 🙂 Woohoo!!

Spring break is such an awesome time for your family to dust off those winter cobwebs and get ready for the warmer weather! We love the extra time to spend together — it’s a great pause button for our family.

Today I want to share with you a few fun kids photography projects that will encourage your child’s creativity and help all of you capture some fun, silly, and memorable moments together!

kids photography projects

1. Make a DIY pinhole camera

This kids photography project is SO FUN! Hop on over to Wolfe’s or Amazon for some photo paper and then grab an old oatmeal can to make this super awesome pinhole camera. Try experimenting with different sized pinholes, and how long you expose your photo paper. Then try this awesome DIY how-to for developing your photo paper — no chemicals necessary!

kids photography projects

2. Create a self-portrait

Better than a selfie! Have kids create a self-portrait that’s all about them: it’s a wonderful photo story of who they are at this moment in their life, whether it’s surrounded by a chair full of lovies or sitting on a stack of favorite books. Or photograph and print a series of photos and let them cut, glue, and re-assemble their own self-portrait! What a fun way for your child to express their creativity and their individuality. Super fun!

 

3. Photo Scavenger Hunt

Check out a ton of awesome photo scavenger hunt lists on Pinterest! These are great for indoors or outdoors:

kids photography projects

4. 5 things

I love this idea because it can totally go in any direction of your child’s creativity! Choose a topic and then photograph 5 things about it. For example, you could photograph 5 things you’re thankful for, or 5 things you love about your family’s pet, or 5 things about spring break. This kids photography project gets them thinking about different perspectives on the same subject and building their own ShutterStory. Super fun!

kids photography projects

 

5. ABC’s

You’ll be amazed by how you can create the ABC’s in your own home! Kids can totally run with their imaginations to find things around their environment at home, outdoors, or on an adventure to the park, library, or other special place to find and photograph the ABC’s. Use shapes in everyday objects to create the letters, then take it a step further and create an awesome photo book from Pinhole Press!

 

6. Set a timer/day in the life

Set your phone or kitchen timer to go off hourly (bonus points if you pick a random time during the hour, like 8:24, 9:24, 10:24, etc) — and photograph what you’re doing when the timer goes off on each hour. At the end of the day you’ll have an awesome compilation of your entire day’s activities, from brushing teeth in the morning through naptimes and spring break playdates. And keep your phone handy for when you’re on the go, too!

kids photography project

Have fun with these kids photography projects! I hope this inspires you and your kids to enjoy photography together during spring break! Cheers!

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Be confident with your camera & learn how to rock your DSLR at a spring workshop — early bird discounts end soon! Learn more here!

Ready to learn more? Sign up (at the top right) for my email newsletter to keep up with news and events around the studio!

To learn more about booking your family portrait session or a workshop, contact me via the website, or email me directly at info@cathymoresphotography.com. Cathy is located in Manhattan, Kansas, and frequently travels to her clients around the Midwest. To find out details regarding upcoming travel dates, or to book a custom travel session, please contact for more information and availability.

 

Happy Monday, friends!

How was your weekend? Like so many of the others lately, we spent a majority of our weekend in local gyms watching basketball games. It’s great to see Parker and his teammates working hard on the court and having fun too. Today I’m sharing 10 tips for photographing kids indoor photos so that you too can capture the action for basketball, wrestling, gymnastics, or any other sports your children are enjoying this winter! Grab your DSLR and let’s get started!

photographing kids indoor sports

 

1. Flash = foul

Don’t commit a personal foul… turn off your flash! It’s distracting to the athletes and other parents around you.

photographing kids indoor sports

 

2. Pump up the ISO

When you’re photographing indoors without a flash, especially in a dark gym, your camera needs to be more sensitive to the available light. Turn up your ISO so that your camera can create properly-exposed images (check your manual for specifics if you aren’t sure how to do this). For all of the images I’m featuring today I was using ISO 3200. Most newer DSLRs are great at handling high ISO situations, so pump it up!

photographing kids indoor sports

3. Choose your shooting mode

If you’re comfortable photographing in manual, you’ll get to flex your creative muscle in using your shutter speed and aperture to capture all of the action. Gyms tend to be a tough lighting environment, and combined with the pace of the game, you might be more comfortable in shutter or aperture priority mode on your DSLR. That’s totally okay! Let the camera do some of the heavy lifting so that you can keep one eye on the game (literally).

photographing kids indoor sports

4. Freeze the action

Whether you’re in shutter priority or manual shooting mode, keep your shutter speed to a minimum of 1/250. Especially when you’re photographing indoor sports, kids move fast and you want to eliminate as much motion blur as you can. A little bit is okay, as long as it’s not distracting to the subject or the story of the photograph.

photographing kids indoor sports

 

5. Nail the shot with sharp focus

Consider using a continuous focus mode so that you can focus on the action as your kids move around the basketball court. In your manual it’s called AF-C (Nikon) or AI Servo (Canon).  You’ll thank yourself for making the switch when you’re photographing kids indoor sports because it’s so much easier to follow the action than moving around a single focus point.

photographing kids indoor sports

 

6. Vary your angles

Just like a player who shoots every basket from the same spot on the court, eventually every image is going to look the same. Shake things up a little bit and vary your shooting locations! This requires you to move around the gym a little bit. I like to position myself in a variety of places throughout the game, both high and low, to photograph different perspectives throughout the game from the bleachers to the sidelines. (Pro tip:  just be polite to other players, parents and spectators when you’re moving around the gym.) When you feel you’ve captured a great moment, move on to the next spot.

photographing kids indoor sports

 

7. Tell the story with composition

Believe it or not, a basketball court is rich with storytelling ideas and opportunities for great composition! Use the lines of the bleachers or court, or the pattern of little shoes running up and down the floor to create a unique story of your child’s experience during the game. The emotion and drama of the highs and lows of the game can make for great images. I also like to get a few photographs while they’re on the bench, too — sometimes that’s a whole other story in itself. 😉

photographing kids indoor sports

 

8. Take multiple shots

Use a continuous (burst) shooting mode to capture several frames in succession. Especially with how fast little ones move, you’ll be able to capture a great series of images of your child in action.

photographing kids indoor sports

 

9. Anticipate the action.

You know best how your child plays. I like to photograph when I’ve had the chance to watch a few games and can anticipate the pace of the game, so it might be later in the season when I bring my camera to photograph. That way when I am behind the lens, I can keep my camera focused on the ball and still know what might happen during the game. I find it to make my work behind the camera more efficient, and really helpful at times when your child doesn’t have the ball — and then when they do catch and shoot, you’re ready for the perfect photograph. (And you can ALWAYS cheer from behind the lens, right?!)

photographing kids indoor sports

 

10. Keep practicing!

Coaches are always encouraging their players to keep shooting even if one hits the rim, right? Same here! Don’t expect every photograph to be a game-winning three-pointer. The best way to get better is with the same perseverance and attitude as your child as they’re working hard in practice, and you’ll start to see more consistent results.

Have fun photographing kids indoor sports this winter! Cheers!

 

• • • • • • • • • •

Be confident with your camera & learn how to rock your DSLR at a spring workshop! Learn more here!

Ready to learn more? Sign up (at the top right) for my email newsletter to keep up with news and events around the studio!

To learn more about booking your family portrait session or a workshop, contact me via the website, or email me directly at info@cathymoresphotography.com. Cathy is located in Manhattan, Kansas, and frequently travels to her clients around the Midwest. To find out details regarding upcoming travel dates, or to book a custom travel session, please contact for more information and availability.

 

 

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